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Charting the Course & Why Hospitals Should Fly - 2-Book Set - Paperback

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Quantity Discounts Synopsis About The Author Reviews Order Hardcover

 

Product Details

The set includes 1 copy of each:

Why Hospitals Should Fly by John J. Nance
and its sequel
Charting the Course by John J. Nance and Kathleen M. Bartholomew

Title: Why Hospitals Should Fly: The Ultimate Flight Plan to Patient Safety and Quality Care
Author: John J. Nance, JD

Format: Paperback - This 2-book set is also available in Hardcover
Publisher: Second River Healthcare
Pub. Date: April 2008
Pages: 225
Edition Number: 5th printing - Aug 2014
Language: English
ISBN-13: 9780974386065
Product Dimensions: 8.5" x 5.5" x .5"

AND

Title: Charting the Course: Launching Patient-Centric Healthcare
Authors: John J. Nance, JD, and Kathleen M. Bartholomew, RN, MN

Format: Paperback - This 2-book set is also available in Hardcover
Publisher: Second River Healthcare
Pub. Date: July 2012
Pages: 319
Edition Number: 1
Language: English
ISBN-13: 9781936406128
Product Dimensions: 8.5" x 5.5" x .75"

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Quantity Discounts

Quantity Discounts are available for this book. Please refer to the chart below for pricing information. Contact us (406)586-8775 with questions. 

Quantity Discount Rate Price
1 to 10 Sets 10% Discount
$50.40
11 to 25 Sets 15% Discount $47.60
26 to 50 Sets 20% Discount $44.80
     

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Synopsis

“How can it be that in 2008, a checked bag on an airline flight is still exponentially safer than a patient in an American hospital?  Simply put, one industry has learned the realities of what it takes to make a human system safe, and the other has not. 

So what does it take to dramatically improve patient safety and service quality?  It takes a host of new and different (and sometimes radical) methods centered on supporting the people on the front lines – those who actually take care of the patient.  It takes a hospital like the one in this story: St. Michael’s.

St. Michael’s itself is fictional, but it is specifically designed to show how the ideal healthcare environment would look and feel.  Are all the methods and ideas and organizational characteristics in use at St. Michael’s largely in use in real institutions?  Not yet, though many are in the process of being adopted, and some are already producing wonderful results.  I encourage you to visit our website WhyHospitalsShouldFly.com, for additional information and insight. . 

But the bottom line is this: What St. Michael’s represents is an achievable paradigm, and if we can’t imagine what constitutes truly safe and collegial hospitals, we can’t build them.”

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About The Author

John J. Nance, JD, brings a rich and varied professional background to American Healthcare. A lawyer, Air Force and airline pilot, prolific internationally-published author, national broadcaster, and professional speaker, he was one of the founding board members of the National Patient Safety Foundation in 1997, and has become one of the major thought leaders in reforming the culture of medicine.

John is a native Texan who grew up in Dallas, holds a bachelor’s degree from SMU and a juris doctor from SMU’s Dedman School of Law, and is a licensed Texas attorney. A recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Award for SMU in 2002 and named Distinguished Alumni for Public Service of the SMU Dedman School of Law in 2010, he is also a decorated Air Force pilot and a Lt. Colonel in the USAF Reserve. John is an internationally recognized air safety advocate, best known to North American television audiences as Aviation Analyst for ABC World News and Aviation Editor for Good Morning America. He is also the nationally-known author of 19 major books, including the highly-acclaimed 2009 book for American Healthcare Why Hospitals Should Fly, which won the prestigious “Book of the Year” award in 2009 from the American College of Healthcare Executives. He lives on San Juan Island, Washington, with his wife and co-author, Kathleen Bartholomew.

Kathleen Bartholomew, RN, MN, is an internationally known speaker and consultant who uses the power of story and her strong background in sociology to study the healthcare culture. The author of Speak Your Truth: Proven Strategies for Effective Nurse-Physician Communication and Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility, she utilized her clinical experience as nurse manager of a 57 bed surgical unit to raise awareness of, and provide ground breaking research on, horizontal violence and physician-nurse communication.

As one of the nation’s most effective speakers on clinical matters affecting relationships, communication, teamwork, and patient safety, she has become a thought leader in changing the way front-line staff relate to each other and leadership to transform the focus of American Healthcare to a truly patient-centric model. She works with boards of directors, CEOs, senior hospital leadership teams, the military and private industry across North America.

Kathleen lives with her husband, co-author John J. Nance, on San Juan Island in Washington State - thanks to match.com.

To learn more about Kathleen Bartholomew, RN, MN or John Nance, JD and bringing them into your organization, please visit their Speaking Pages.

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Reviews

“This book is a tour de force, and no one but John Nance could have written it.  He, alone, masters in one mind the fields of aviation, health care safety, medical malpractice law, organizational sociology, media communication, and, as if that were not enough, the art of fine writing.  Only he could have made sophisticated, scientifically disciplined instruction about the nature and roots of safety into a page-turner.  Medical care has a ton yet to learn from the decades of progress that have brought aviation to unprecedented levels of safety, and, in instructing us all about those lessons, John Nance is not just a bridge-builder – he is the bridge.  This book should be required reading for anyone willing to face the facts about what it will take for health care to be as safe as it truly can be.”
Donald M. Berwick, MD, MPP, President and CEO, Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI)

“Framed as fiction, but heavily laced with lessons from the real world, the story of St Michael’s transformation to a culture of safety shows how it can be done.  There are no bleeding hearts in this story.  The protagonists, both those who have changed and the skeptical visitor, are all hard-nosed realists, people who work on the front line of medicine where egos are big, tradition is strong, change is difficult and the stakes are immense. They know it is difficult, and they have scars to show for it.  But more importantly, they show it is possible.  You want to know what a culture of safety in health care is like?  Start reading.”
Lucian L. Leape, MD, Harvard School of Public Health

“I can’t think of anyone active at the national scene in quality and safety in healthcare who could have written a book like this one.  Nance is a formidable character in real life, as a decorated military pilot, attorney, television celebrity and global airline safety expert.  In addition, he is a recognized award-winning writer who knows how to tell a story and create lasting and impressive characters.  In this book, John has brought together all of his formidable skills to create a story full of drama, pride, motivation and outright wonder.  He takes a seemingly bland subject like improving the safety of medical care and tells a story that is heartfelt and compelling.  I can truly say that Nance’s book reads like a novel and I simply couldn’t put it down.”
David B. Nash, MD, MBA, President, Jefferson College of Population Health

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